FCB Chicago helps IL organization stop a bullet

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The agency’s latest
effort to make
the world safer
is an 853-page
educational book
and political
action website

FCB Chicago and the Illinois Council Against Handgun Violence (ICHV) unveiled The Gun Violence History Book during a celebration at St. James Plaza on Tuesday afternoon.

Besides outlining 228 years of gun violence history in America, the 853-page volume also embodies a feat that history has been unable to accomplish: stopping an actual bullet.

Literally. The published edition took a shot to the cover.

 
THE GUN VIOLENCE HISTORY BOOK

 

The articles, facts, and data within The Gun Violence History Book are intended to be a tool to teach current and future voters how we can stop repeating history. Additionally, the book has formed part of a learning plan for teachers and schools in Chicago-land.

The page where the bullet finally stopped contains a message for readers:

“This bullet stopped.
But history continues
to be written.
Support universal
background checks at
stopgunviolencehistory.com.”

 


 

The corresponding website enables people to connect with their senators and send automated emails urging for universal background checks.

The nonprofit is also encouraging communities to support Fix the FOID Act [HB 96] — a new legislation with the goal of addressing loopholes in our existing gun licensing system — by encouraging lawmakers to support.

ICHV’s goal is to have 100 notes sent to senators by National Gun Violence Awareness Day (Friday, June 7). Simply visit www.fixthefoid.com.

 
FCB’s tradition of community support
Co-producing and co-sponsoring The Gun Violence History Book is the latest of the FCB’s sustained commitment to making the world a safer place.

The agency’s mission to wipe out gun violence has been energized by its four-year partnership with ICHV.

Their efforts include 2015’s Unforgotten, a PSA campaign that featured eight statues of gun violence victims; 2017’s Gold Lion-winning spot, Teddy Gun, a remarkable commentary on gun control laws; and the recent Most Dangerous Street installation, which was launched last month.

FCB Chicago has also been busy working its day job as a full service ad agency serving dozens of global brands like Cottonelle, GE Appliances, and the Chicago Museum of Contemporary Art. Its Michigan Ave. office is also home to the experiential multimedia performance workshop series, Clark Street Bridge.

 
Send your campaign updates to Reel Chicago Editor Dan Patton, dan@reelchicago.com.

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